Curriculum

WEDNESDAYS

A DAY THAT WILL LIVE IN INFAMY
Course ID: 1715

The events of Sunday morning December 7, 1941, have always been shrouded in mystery. The hows, the whys, the shame, and the anger have stayed with us over these many years. In this course, we will attempt to delve into possible answers (or more likely, possible suggestions) as to the complex historical, political, and diplomatic factors that came into play before, during, and after this tragic event, from both the American and Japanese points of view. Such factors as recent Japanese history, development of Japanese diplomacy, and Washington’s military communications and interaction, as well as the attack itself and its aftermath, will be examined.

WENDELL MUSSER, MD, is a retired academic physician who held faculty positions at Indiana, Duke, George Washington, and Emory Universities and the University of Kentucky. He is a longtime book collector, primarily of books about Winston Churchill and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and feels that a day away from OLLI is a day away from happiness.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 9:00–10:30am, The Bishop’s House. Maximum: 40. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1715

 

PERSONALITIES, POLICIES & THE ASIAN ECONOMIC “MIRACLE”
Course ID: 1739

China raised more people out of abject poverty in the past thirty-five years than at any time, anywhere in history, while India made barely a dent in its levels of poverty. Why? China accounted for 33 percent of global trade in 1820 but less than 5 percent 150 years later. Why? How was Singapore transformed in our lifetimes from one of the poorest places in Asia to the richest? Why did Pakistan become dominated by military rule when partitioned from the world’s biggest democracy and is now a nuclear-armed, potentially failed state, while India is expected to become a future superpower? In this course, we will attempt to answer such questions by discussing the outcomes achieved by three leaders who were catalysts for exceptional economic growth in their countries (Singapore’s Lee Kwan Yew, China’s Deng Xiaoping, and India’s Manmohan Singh) and three leaders who inhibited the growth potential of their economies (China’s Mao Zedong, India’s Indira Gandhi, and Pakistan’s Ali Bhutto).

RUSSELL LEIMAN grew up in South Africa. For almost thirty years, living in London, Hong Kong, Tokyo, and New York, he worked in international finance, focusing primarily on emerging markets in Asia. He was executive director of the Asia-Pacific region for The Nature Conservancy for thirteen years, to 2012.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 9:00–10:30am, Judea Reform Education Building. Maximum: 30. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1739

 

YOUR NEUROPLASTIC SELF: Explorations in Awareness Through Movement
Course ID: 0379

Neuroplasticity is a hot topic these days. Did you know that your brain changes in response to your experience? Do you know how to structure your experience to benefit from this process? Over sixty years ago, long before scientists had the technology to document the brain’s rewiring capacity, Dr. Moshe Feldenkrais created an educational process—The Feldenkrais Method of Somatic Education—that does exactly this. In this course, you will explore simple but unusual movement sequences. By linking them with your attention, awareness, thinking, feeling, and sensing in a specific way, your brain will create startling changes in your neuromuscular organization. If you want to refine balance, reduce pain and discomfort, reshape posture, regain flexibility and coordination, and learn to breathe, turn, sit, stand, and walk more easily, join us in this unique learning process. This course is suitable for both new and returning students, and both women and men are welcome.

Please note: You must be able to lie on the floor comfortably. Please bring a mat (or thick blanket or sleeping bag) on which to lie, and some support for your head, if you need it. Wear comfortable clothes for movement, and dress in layers. Please contact the instructor (kd@movewithelan.com) to discuss any concerns you might have about your ability to participate.

KAREN DOLD, a guild certified Feldenkrais practitioner, has been teaching Awareness Through Movement classes and workshops in the Triangle area since 2000. She sees clients for private sessions in her offices in Chapel Hill and Cary.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 9:00–10:30 am, Judea Reform Education Building. Maximum: 20. Fee: $60. Course ID: 0379

 

MUSIC & EMOTIONS: How the Composer Manipulates Your Feelings
Course ID: 1737

Music awakens emotions and feelings in mind and body. Music is a nonverbal form of expression that does not require semantic interpretation. How, then, does music reflect emotions? What causes the listener to react in certain ways? How do composers manipulate the listener’s feelings, thoughts, and energies, particularly when there are no lyrics to influence reactions and responses? Where in your body are you sensing? What is causing certain sensations and feelings? What is your brain doing? Hearing music is a whole-body holistic experience, not just auditory. Come, listen, and “feel” what you think you are hearing in the music, and discover what and how the various music components—there are at least six—alter awareness and physical and emotional responsiveness. This course includes lectures, listening, and music-making participation, using CD and live performance samples, and periodic audience participation in nonverbal self-expression.

Recommended text:
-  Daniel J. Schneck and Dorita S. Berger, The Music Effect: Music Physiology and Clinical Applications (ISBN 978-1843107712), Jessica Kingsley, 2006, $29.19.

DORITA BERGER, PhD, a former concert pianist, is an educator, an author, a board-certified music therapist, and an international lecturer on music in human adaptation and music in science and medicine. Her publications include Music Therapy, Sensory Integration, and the Autistic Child; The Music Affect: Music Physiology and Clinical Applications (with coauthor Dr. Daniel Schneck); Toward the Zen of Performance: Music Improvisation Therapy for Developing Self-Confidence in the Performer; and Eurhythmics: Sensorimotor Music-Based Treatment for Autism and Neurophysiologic Diagnoses (in press).

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 9:00–10:30am, Judea Reform Education Building. Maximum: 20. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1737

 

FAN YOUR CREATIVE FLAMES: Yoga, Painting, Journaling
Course ID: 1738

We are born with natural creative impulses that flow through us at all times. As our life experiences create restrictive survival instincts, we can find ourselves stuck behind roadblocks of doubt, judgment, and fear. Remembering how to intuit our creative impulses and take action from our bodies’ deep well of wisdom can have a positive ripple effect in our lives. This workshop uses MindBody Centering yoga postures, process painting, and meditative journaling flowing seamlessly to provide resources to dismantle your creative blocks and allow a continual flow of energy between the supportive roots of your body and the beautiful blossoms of your imagination.

Please note: Students should bring a journal. There will be a $10 materials fee for acrylic paints, paper, brushes, colored pencils, and pens, which the instructor will provide. Please bring exact amount to the first class; refunds at the discretion of the instructor.

CATHERINE J. HOWARD writes about our bodies’ deeply intuitive creative powers. She also teaches classes and workshops that blend yoga, art, journaling and yoga therapy elements to remove creative blocks and break up internal obstacles that sideline us from clear and empathic communication.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 9:00–10:30am, Judea Reform Education Building. Maximum: 12. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1738

 

THE WRITINGS OF PAUL TILLICH: A Christian’s Yearning for Meaning in His Life
Course ID: 1717

Paul Tillich, the renowned Lutheran theologian and professor at Harvard University and the University of Chicago, wrote these words: “Sometimes I think it is my mission to bring faith to the faithless, and doubt to the faithful”; “The first duty of love is to listen”; and “History has shown that the most terrible crimes against love have been committed in the name of fanatically defended doctrines.” Tillich spoke to the universal human search for life’s meaning and purpose, not in traditional religious terminology, but rather, in existential philosophical language. During this course, we will explore a sampling of the timeless writings of Tillich.

Please note: You will need to read a 20- to 25-page assignment prior to class and be prepared to discuss the materials.        

Required text:
-  F. Forrester Church, ed., The Essential Tillich: An Anthology of the Writings of Paul Tillich (ISBN 978022680343), University of Chicago Press, 1987, $22.53.

BILL and MICKEY DEPRATER are retired Presbyterian Church (USA) ministers. Bill has read Tillich’s writings since his introduction during seminary and particularly enjoys how Tillich embraces theology and philosophy in expressing his insights into the human faith journey. Mickey studied Tillich’s writings in her theological studies and looks forward to exploring his writings more deeply.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 11:00am–12:30pm, The Bishop’s House. Maximum: 14. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1717

 

AN AUCTION HOUSE VIEW: Mid-19th-Century Decorative Arts and a Wine Venture
Course ID: 1716

This course is designed as a lecture series focusing on mid- to late-19th-century decorative arts, including the work of Thomas Day, a cabinetmaker and free man of color living in Milton, North Carolina; the art of glass, including the American Brilliant period and the designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany; the geopolitical influences on Victorian jewelry design; the symbolic significance of the carved female figureheads in 19th-century Victorian Britain; the form and function of Victorian silver; and the neuropsychology of wine and how we think about the wine drink.

LELAND LITTLE is president of Leland Little Auctions, whose area of expertise is Southern furniture; NANCY BLOUNT is director of the Fine and Estate Jewelry Division of Leland Little Auctions.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 11:00am–12:30pm, The Bishop’s House. Maximum: 35. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1716

 

ISSUES IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: Why the Great Differences? - CANCELLED
Course ID: 1740

The main issues that have made a difference in levels of economic and social development in various regions of the world are the focus of this course. Less-developed countries still account for a major share of the world’s population, and, despite great efforts being made at national and international levels to improve living conditions and economic growth of these countries, not enough has been achieved. We will discuss major reasons for this situation and see how successful developing countries have met their goals. Join us for lively discussion and a more complete understanding of the problems and challenges of development. Invited speakers will share their expertise on some of the covered countries.

STEPHAN WITTKOWSKY, who attended Cornell University, is a native of Guatemala who now spends about half a year in Chapel Hill. He is a retired economist, businessman, entrepreneur, consultant, and professor. Before undertaking work in the private sector, he worked with a United Nations industrial research institute in Central America.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 11:00am–12:30pm, Judea Reform Education Building. Maximum: 30. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1740

 

THE WORLD TODAY
Course ID: 0393

This course is for those who are interested in current events. Each week, we will discuss news from the United States, the world, and the Triangle. We will begin each class with a list of proposed topics; class members may also offer topics for discussion. Active participation is encouraged (but not mandatory), since it expands our mutual understanding of the many events that might affect us. Discussions are enriched by the variety of backgrounds, expertise, and viewpoints of class members. Topics are discussed knowledgeably, respectfully, and sometimes with passion, but we always end with humor, looking forward to the next class. We offer two sections of this course. The discussion leaders will rotate between the two sections. Each has participated in The World Today discussions many times, each brings a distinctive style and background to the class, and, most important, each will solicit a wide spectrum of views from class members.

HENRY BLINDER served as the city attorney for the City of Durham for many years prior to his retirement. He is past president of the North Carolina Association of Municipal Attorneys and a former deputy attorney general for the State of New Jersey. He has a JD degree from Duke University School of Law and has lived in Durham for more than thirty years.

RICHARD ELLMAN is a retired New York CPA who has a keen interest in current events. He moved to Durham in 2006 and immediately became involved in OLLI.

TOM HAUCK grew up overseas and then worked for Texaco managing petroleum marketing companies in West Africa and Central and South America, ending his career in Nigeria.

DOUG LONGMAN has taught several courses at OLLI on international political economy, public
policy, and economics. He has a doctorate in business administration and has taught previously at the University of Chicago, UNC–Chapel Hill, and the University of Texas.

BOB LYNCH has taught and counseled students from the seventh grade to the university level during a forty-four-year career in education. With two master’s degrees (Antioch College for social studies and NYU
for counseling), he has spent the bulk of his career as a high school counselor.

Please note: There are two six-week sections of this course open for enrollment. When registering, enter the four-digit Course ID (0393) into the course search. You will then need to choose between the two sections. If registering by paper, write the preferred section on the line.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 11:00am–12:30pm, Judea Reform Education Building. Maximum: 30. Fee: $60.

Section 1: Course ID: 0393-033

Section 2: Course ID: 0393-034

 

MURHYTHMICS FOR SENIOR ADULTS: Eurhythmic Movement for Holistic Health
Course ID: 1730

The best way to organize the mind-body for stress reduction and holistic health is to interact musically with others. For senior adults, research indicates the strengthened body coordination, improved balance, and decreased risk of falling as positive results of eurhythmic music-rhythm-movement activities. MuRhythmics is eurhythmic movement responses activated by live, leader-improvised music on piano and a variety of instruments. MuRhythmics is not “dance”; activities include rhythmic movement, drumming, instrumental playing, vocalization, and more. Participants will engage in positive social interactions evolving and inspired by the music. Persons with restricted movements (walkers, wheel chair, physical incapacities, etc.) can be included. No training in music, instrument skills, or movement required.

Required: Please bring a recorder (instrument) and a kazoo.

DORITA BERGER, PhD, a former concert pianist, is an educator, an author, a board-certified music therapist, and an international lecturer on music in human adaptation and music in science and medicine. Her publications include Music Therapy, Sensory Integration, and the Autistic Child; The Music Affect: Music Physiology and Clinical Applications (with coauthor Dr. Daniel Schneck); Toward the Zen of Performance: Music Improvisation Therapy for Developing Self-Confidence in the Performer; and Eurhythmics: Sensorimotor Music-Based Treatment for Autism and Neurophysiologic Diagnoses (in press).

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 11:00am–12:30pm, Judea Reform Education Building. Maximum: 18. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1730

 

THE GREAT PRESIDENTS: Leadership in American History
Course ID: 0896

Ranking the forty-three men who have served as president is one of the most enjoyable games played by American historians. Article 11 of the Constitution established the presidency, but it was the men subsequently elected to that office who gave substance to the words. This course examines the most significant presidential tenures and traces the development of the office in times of war and peace. Although “greatness” is often controversial, historians agree that relatively few of our chief executives deserve the accolade. Our discussions will consider the many functions of the president and his (or her) central role in public policy. America’s great presidents, along with the mediocre and some outright failures, are the subjects of our sprint through national history.

GEORGE J. LANKEVICH, professor emeritus of history at City University of New York, has written more than twenty books and teaches a variety of courses at OLLI.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 11:00am–12:30pm, Galloway Ridge Retirement Center, 3000 Galloway Ridge, Pittsboro. Maximum: 40. Fee: $60. Course ID: 0896

 

HANK WILLIAMS: “Moanin’ the Blues”
Course ID: 1703

Few artists in the annals of American popular music have identified with and reflected the cultural mindset of Middle American society more than country music singer/songwriter Hiram King “Hank” Williams. His talents have been recognized as an influence by a wide range of musicians. However, accompanying his short career and ultimate “larger than life” legacy was a personal battle that was anything but “supreme.” Williams was born in South Alabama, in near poverty and lived through a cruel and emotionally controlling environment as an adolescent. He suffered from these childhood traumas as an adult, yet even in his short life of twenty-nine years, and under the weight of it all, he used these conditions as a springboard to earn his “legendary” status, writing classics such as “Cold, Cold Heart,” “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry,” and “Your Cheating Heart,” as well as classic gospel songs such as “I Saw the Light” and “House of Gold.” In this course, we will focus on all the cultural elements created by this great legend and view musical videos by and about him and his life. We may even enjoy a live musical performance.

BILLY YEARGIN is a veteran OLLI instructor. He has a master’s degree in liberal studies from Duke University; taught US history, Western civilization, and Southern culture in three North Carolina community colleges; and served as headmaster/interim president of Oak Ridge Military Academy, a private military college preparatory academy.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 1:30–3:00pm, The Bishop’s House. Maximum: 38. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1703

 

SPORT & THE SPECTACLE
Course ID: 1718

What good are sports? Why do we choose to watch, or not? In a series of discussions intended for fans and nonfans alike, this course will touch on disciplines such as law, economics, psychology, and sociology. Topics will include the growth of spectator sports in the 19th century, the role of labor and antitrust laws in establishing America’s sports system, the history of the NCAA and its amateurism policies, public subsidies of stadia, the regulation and care of athletes’ bodies (from performance-enhancing drugs to concussion awareness), and the modern spectator experience. Attention also will be paid to the implications of such uniquely American sport practices as salary caps, player drafts, elite college competition, and pro franchising. Readings will include literary essays, journalistic excerpts, and academic analyses. This freewheeling course is designed to deepen and challenge our understanding of a most basic feature of the cultural landscape.

DAVID FELLERATH is a freelance writer and editor who grew up obsessed with baseball, golf, and UNC–Chapel Hill basketball. These days, he is most interested in grassroots soccer, and he is a co-owner of the FC United of Manchester, an English semipro team. This is his second OLLI offering, after a course on the history of soccer. 

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 1:30–3:00pm, The Bishop’s House. Maximum: 18. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1718

 

IMPROVING K–12 EDUCATION IN NORTH CAROLINA
Course ID: 1756

Test results show that the majority of our poor and minority children are failing their school reading and math tests. Over 50 percent of all North Carolina high school graduates require remedial help to perform first-year community-college-level work. This is an unacceptable situation, both for the uneducated person and the economy of our country. In this course, invited experts will document our current situation and set forth the purpose and goals of an education. The experts will then recommend possible improvements to enable the majority of children to receive the better education they deserve, which we are paying for and our country needs to maintain its competiveness. There will be ample class time for interaction with the invited presenters.

TOM HAUCK grew up overseas and then worked for Texaco managing petroleum marketing companies in West Africa and Central and South America, ending his career in Nigeria.

DOUG LONGMAN has taught several courses at OLLI on international political economy, public policy, and economics. He has a doctorate in business administration and taught previously at the University of Chicago, UNC–Chapel Hill, and the University of Texas. 

BOB LYNCH has taught and counseled students from the seventh grade to the university level during a forty-four-year career in education. With two master’s degrees (Antioch College for social studies and NYU
for counseling), he has spent the bulk of his career as a high school counselor.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 1:30–3:00pm, Judea Reform Education Building. Maximum: 30. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1756

 

FROM PAGE TO STAGE: Reading, Understanding, Performing Drama
Course ID: 1743

This course will provide an opportunity to read and discuss a series of one-act plays and subsequently perform them with script in hand. Such issues as ageism, sex for seniors, and crossing the generations will be presented in a realistic format. After reading and discussing the plays, participants will be coached toward making the words “come off the page” to achieve a sense of reality and immediacy. Friends may be invited to view the plays in the last session.

Required text:
-  Ann McDonough and Kent R. Brown, A Grand Entrance: Scenes and Monologues for Mature Actors (ISBN 978-0871299338), Dramatic Publishing, 2000, $18.95. Available at www.dramaticpublishing.com.

MARV AXELROD has recently appeared as the obstreperous lawyer in The Perfect Day by S. J. Barry at the Carrboro Art Center. He directed and played in The First Sin by Aharon Megged and directed a series of one-act plays for mature audiences at the Jewish Community Center. He is a retired teacher from New York City, where he taught ESL and directed improvisational theater groups for many years.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 1:30–3:00pm, Judea Reform Education Building. Maximum: 12. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1743

 

RUDOLPH NUREYEV: An In-Depth Look at Ballet’s Most Recognizable Dancer
Course ID: 1742

Rudolph Nureyev is one of the most recognizable dancers of the 20th century. This course will offer documentaries and biographical material about his life, as well as videos of ballets he created for the Paris Opera Ballet.

BETSY BULLEN, a student of ballet all her life, has introduced hundreds of OLLI students to the joys
of this art form. She is back this spring with a brand new course.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 1:30–3:00pm, Judea Reform Education Building. Maximum: 30. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1742

 

STILL-LIFE DRAWING WITH GRAPHITE: Drawing What You Love
Course ID: 1741

Each of us will use our own objects from home and set up, photograph, and draw an original, meaningful still-life composition. A list of supplies will be provided after you enroll.

Required materials:

  • pencils: regular or woodless graphite; HB, 4B, 6B (Faber Castell, Derwent, Kohinoor), or automatic pencils
  • pencil sharpener (if necessary)
  • kneaded eraser
  • vanish 4-in-1 eraser
  • tortillions
  • sanding block (for woodless pencils)
  • transfer paper and/or grid on acetate
  • translucent design vellum or onion skin (tracing paper)
  • a surface support that is hard and smooth, such as glass, masonite, or board
  • paper: Bristol Plate (smooth paper), Canson, or Strathmore Pad

Recommended text:
-  David Sanmiguel, Art of Drawing: The Complete Course (ISBN 978-1402709326), Sterling, 2003, $14.06.

ELLEN NEWMAN has been studying, practicing, consulting, and teaching art for more than fifty years. She is always willing to share her knowledge of art with students of all levels.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 1:00–3:00pm, Judea Reform Education Building. Maximum: 10. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1741

 

THE WONDERS OF BRAZIL: Its Natural Beauty, People, Industry, and Culture
Course ID: 1719

In this course, we will explore Brazil’s wonders. Well known for its coffee, the Amazon, Rio, Bossa Nova, Samba, and Carnaval, Brazil also boasts an astounding array of natural wonders, including “the meeting of the rivers,” the Iguaçu falls, and the Bay of Guanabara in Rio. Brazil is diverse in every sense—from the arid northeast to the lush beauty of Gramado, from the hypermodern Brasília to the ancient city of Pelourinho, from the megalopolis of São Paulo to the farms and plantations—and so are its people, who represent virtually every region of the world and include descendants of US Confederates who established a new life there after the Civil War. As an indirect result of Napoleon’s invasion of Europe, Brazil became America’s only Monarchy. Now a Republic, Brazil is the seventh-largest world economy and the fifth-largest in population and area. The session on music will feature a live guitar performance.

SUZANA ALBANO is an attorney who has practiced immigration law, family law, international law, and contracts in Brazil and the United States. She received her LLM from Duke University and her JD from the Catholic University of Santos, Brazil. She loves teaching not only legal topics but also English and sociocultural subjects.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 3:15–4:45pm, The Bishop’s House. Maximum: 20. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1719

 

LE CORBUSIER: The Architect’s Victories and Failures
Course ID: 1729

Charles Edouard Jeanneret (1887–1965), the Swiss architect known as Le Corbusier, was an intriguing man who lived during a fascinating time. From his formative creation of a modular architecture at the age of only twenty-seven, to his work in creating (or “stealing”?) world-renowned designs for furniture, to his self-declared penchant for Josephine Baker, the creator’s work cannot fully be understood without first studying his personality. Through this course, we will investigate six specific works of architecture as well as Corbu’s visual art, his influences on the European modernist community, his rather bewitching convictions, and the contemporary legacy he left behind. Was he a success or a failure? A madman or a genius? A Vichy collaborator or a humanitarian? You decide.

Required text:
-  Le Corbusier, Towards a New Architecture (ISBN 978-0486250236), Dover, 1985, $10.83.

With a classical education in studio art and interior design and a master’s degree in architectural history, ALVA HORTON owns and operates Gingham Creative, a marketing firm dedicated to promoting the building, design, and historic preservation sectors in both the United States and the United Kingdom.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 3:00–4:45pm (please note times), Judea Reform Education Building. Maximum: 20. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1729

 

THE ART OF TRAVEL PLANNING: The Ins and Outs of Planning for Vacation Travel or, What a Good Travel Agent Knows
Course ID: 1744

This course will discuss things you should think about when planning vacation travel: Why do you want to travel? Should you use a travel agent? Is travel insurance worthwhile? We will discuss what you should know about cruises—the big cruise lines are not the only option. Are tour companies the way to go, and what do they have to offer? Tours come in different shapes and sizes; it is not “if it is Tuesday, this must be Belgium” anymore. Where and when should you go? How should you research your trip in books and on the internet? What about packing for a trip? What about a volunteer vacation?

Please note: Participants are encouraged to acquire a good atlas.

SCOTT GOLDSMITH trained as a travel agent and completed a college certification program. He interned at two different travel agencies to learn the business. He has been traveling for more than forty years and has visited forty-seven states, more than thirty-five countries, and six continents. He regularly plans trips for his wife and himself and for friends, often to exotic places. He loves exploring different cultures and trying different foods.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 3:15–4:45pm, Judea Reform Education Building. Maximum: 30. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1744

 

PAINTING ON THE RIGHT & LEFT SIDES OF THE BRAIN: Making Sense of Painting
Course ID: 1759

Learning to paint can be bewildering because of the sheer number of choices involved: subject, composition, materials, tools, colors, and the all-important smock versus apron. Fortunately, you have two guides, Right Brain and Left Brain. In this course, we will get to know both, and we will follow them through three paintings. No drawing or painting experience is necessary. Art supply sources may be found on the course website, OLLInewacrylics.weebly.com.

Please note: There will be a $20 fee for materials. Please bring the exact change to the first class; refunds at the discretion of the instructor.

Required materials:

  • one 1/2-inch and one 1/4-inch flat synthetic bristle brush
  • three 11x14-inch painting supports (canvas or canvas board)
  • paper towels
  • water container

PAT SCHEIBLE brings a Left Brain from her first career as a research scientist and a Right Brain from her second career as a visual artist. She has taught the popular OLLI courses “Hands-On Color” and “The New Acrylics.”

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 3:15–4:45pm, Judea Reform Education Building. Maximum: 30. Fee: $60. Course ID: 1759

 

NEW HORIZONS CHORUS: Spring
Course ID: 1757

Join with fellow OLLI members in a serious, but fun, atmosphere to learn healthy singing techniques. Making music is enjoyable, and it can help maintain both good mental and physical health. Experienced as well as novice singers are welcome.

In the Fall and Winter terms, the New Horizons Chorus works on preparing pieces for an end-of-semester concert. During the Spring term, there will still be plenty of singing, learning music, and taking on choral literature, but the focus will be more on vocal technique and health, music theory as it applies to vocalists, and the “nuts and bolts” of choral music.

GLENN MEHRBACH is our director, and CARMEN WARD is our piano accompanist.

6 Wednesdays, April 15–May 20, 3:30–5:00pm, in the Chorus Room at Durham Academy Middle School Campus, 3116 Academy Road, Durham. (There is ample parking after 3:15pm, when parents have picked up students from school.) Maximum: 50. Fee: $60; covers group instruction and sheet music. Course ID: 1757

You must be a paid member of OLLI at Duke ($35 annual dues) for the 2014–2015 academic year.

 

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